Womens fashions victorian america dating photographs

Updated with nearly 30 high-quality vintage images, the second edition of this lavishly illustrated book provides irrefutable documentation of ladies’ fashions worn in Victorian America from 1860 to 1900.Extensively researched using nineteenth-century fashion, beauty, etiquette, household, and medical literature, the book explores the fluctuations in clothing styles including undergarments, casual wear, sports clothes, common dress, evening attire, hairstyles, and jewelry, while tracing the fascinating impact fashion had on the mental, physical, and social lives of our Victorian ancestors.Chapters on personal hygiene, cosmetics, clothing manufacture, laundry, and the dating of vintage photographs are included, along with updated prices.

The second edition of this comprehensive and easy-to-read book is an invaluable resource to historians, theatrical costumers, genealogists, museum curators, and historical fashion and photography enthusiasts.Size: 8 1/2″ x 11″ | 385 photos | Price Guide | 176 pp ISBN13: 9780764339721 | Binding: soft cover Linda Setnik graduated from Cal State University Northridge with honors in history.Having a lifelong love for women’s social history and clothing, she’s delved through thousands of period photographs as well as examined Victorian clothing in detail.The fashion of the 19th century is renowned for its corsets, bonnets, top hats, bustles and petticoats.Women’s fashion during the Victorian period was largely dominated by full skirts, which gradually moved to the back of the silhouette.

However, towards the end of the period, the less restrictive Aesthetic style began to emerge.

The trailing skirts and broad-brimmed hats of mid-decade are giving way to narrower dresses and hats with deep crowns.

Men wear top hats with formal morning dress or bowlers with lounge suits.

Fashion in the period 1900–1909 in the Western world continued the long elegant lines of the 1890s.

Tall, stiff collars characterize the period, as do women's broad hats and full "Gibson Girl" hairstyles.

A new, columnar silhouette introduced by the couturiers of Paris late in the decade signaled the approaching abandonment of the corset as an indispensable garment.